The earth is the Lord’s

Jun 11, 2014 by

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It is said that giving is the spiritual thermometer of the church. A healthy congregation will experience healthy giving because it is tied directly to our understanding of God and our relationship to him. And yet, it seems to be a difficult topic for us to talk about.

A few years ago, I heard Walter Brueggemann share on the topic of money and giving and was profoundly impacted by his words. At the core of his teaching was from Psalm 24, “The earth is the Lord’s and everything in it.”

“The earth is the Lord’s and everything in it.” Take a few moments to ponder that statement of faith. It is truly a powerful confession of faith. Let it sink in. Now, ponder this question: Who do you think the world belongs to? Is this confession your confession? Because if it is, I want to challenge you to think abut some of the implications.

As Christians, we believe that the Earth is the God’s creation. Everything in it is a gift to us from God . . . even life itself. I like to think of it in this way: Our days and the things we fill our days with are on loan from God. He is the landlord and we are the tenants of this beautiful world we live in.

Gen. 1:27-30 says this: “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. God blessed them and said to them, ‘Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.’ Then God said, ‘I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food. And to all the beasts of the earth and all the birds in the sky and all the creatures that move along the ground — everything that has the breath of life in it — I give every green plant for food.’ And it was so.”

This is where the term stewardship comes from. God’s intention and purpose in creating us was to be stewards to the earth with all its blessings that has been given to us. The word literally means “An official person who has been appointed to look over someone else’s property.” We are God’s stewards.

“Stewardship is God’s way of raising people, not man’s way of raising money.” — Willmer Smith

We are called to live as people of the Doxology. Praise God from whom all blessings flow. What we have and what we have earned is a blessing from God. He has given us the resources, talents, gifts and tools we need to thrive on this Earth. This is our worshipful response to the many blessings God has given us: that we live our lives in a way that point to the God who is the giver of blessing.

Maybe you are struggling to feel like you are experiencing any type of blessing in your life. That’s OK. We all struggle with feeling like that at different times in our lives. Too often we have a distorted view of what blessing is. But the biblical definition of blessing is the divine gift of provision for and support of life. Most of us can say that we are blessed.

I have had the privilege of worshipping in many countries in my lifetime and this seems to be a difficult one for us Americans. It is always a humbling experience to worship with persons in a less-privileged culture and watch their joy and zeal as they dance to the offering plate and give whatever they might have that day be it a fish they caught, a chicken, a couple of coins or whatever else they could give. They were grateful to be alive and excited to express that gratitude to God.

We worship the Lord of the Sabbath. You may remember the story of the Exodus? When the children roamed around in the wilderness for 40 years? Those 40 years were not a waste of time. God’s sole purpose of the perfect number of years was to form a Sabbath people.

Early on in the process, the children of Israel began to grumble about not having enough, in particular not having enough to eat. And so God sends manna from heaven and quail for the children of Israel. But there were important instructions that went along with it. They were only to gather what they needed for that day. Of course there were some who were enterprising who decided to go ahead and get extra so they wouldn’t have to work so hard the next day or maybe fear that there wouldn’t be enough. The next day, they awoke to find that it was rotten. God wanted this people he was forming to know . . . to know . . . that He alone was their provider.

However, on the sixth day before the Sabbath, they could gather what they needed for that day of worship and rest. Miraculously it did not rot and they had enough; more than enough. The Sabbath was created to remind the children of Israel that they had more than enough. They could depend on God to provide everything they needed each day. God was forming his people to be a people of abundance and not a people of scarcity.

Perhaps you know someone that lived through the depression? It was really hard for people to change from a life of scarcity to a life of abundance. For years, my grandmother saved odd little things because she was living out of that story, a story of need and scarcity. It is not easily done. But that is what God was working at with the children of Israel. That is the story that God intends for us: to live a life of abundance because we have a God that creates, provides and sustains.

Don’t get me wrong here, this is not about the prosperity Gospel. This is about the Creator who gives life itself and offers us the sustenance both spiritual and physical. With that comes the call to be careful stewards of the wondrous creation.

So when we exercise the spiritual discipline of giving, we are exercising some core beliefs about God’s identity and our identity.

When we give we are essentially growing in these important areas of our faith:

  • We are reaffirming our belief that God is the creator and giver of life.
  • We acknowledge our dependence on God as provider above and beyond all other means of provision on this earth.
  • We open ourselves to experience and exercise the freedom God as given us from the slavery of money and scarcity.

Here are some ways you can practice these powerful truths:

Try keeping a gratitude journal each day. Simply jot down the little blessings in your or day that might go unnoticed. At the end of the day take time to thank God for each thing on your list.

Try helping a stranger this week — by opening a door, smiling, being polite, paying a compliment. Notice how that makes you feel, how it shapes you, how it empowers you to be a giver instead of a taker. That is living out of a place of abundance. Share what you learn about your experience with a friend or family member.

Beth Jarrett is pastor of Harrisonburg (Va.) First Church of the Brethren. She writes at treesofmamre.com, where this blog post originally appeared.


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